ISSTA 2011

Eric | July 27, 2010

Call for PapersAs publicity chair for ISSTA 2011, it is my pleasure to invite you all to Toronto, Ontario for July 17th-21st, 2011.

Toronto promises to be an exciting venue and our excellent program committee will certainly do its best to provide an great program. However, a conference is nothing without strong research papers! You are invited to submit technical papers describing original research in testing or analysis of computer software. Papers describing theoretical or empirical research, new techniques, or in-depth case studies of testing and analysis methods and tools are welcome.

You can download the full call for papers on the right. Workshop proposals are due Friday, November 19, 2011 and research papers on Friday, February 4, 2011.

Finally, if you wish to promote ISSTA yourself, you can download a web banner here.

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Research
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ACM, ISSTA

3rd NASA Formal Methods Symposium

Eric | July 26, 2010

The NASA Formal Methods Symposium is a forum for theoreticians and practitioners from academia, government and industry, with the goals of identifying challenges and providing solutions to achieving assurance in mission- and safety-critical systems. The focus of the symposium is on formal methods, and aims to foster collaboration between NASA researchers and engineers and the wider aerospace and academic formal methods communities. The symposium will be comprised of a mixture of invited talks by leading researchers and practitioners, presentation of accepted papers, and panels.

Important Dates

Submission deadline: December 19, 2010
Notification of acceptance/rejection: January 21, 2011
Final version due: February 18, 2011
Conference: April 18-20, 2011

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Research
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NASA, NFM

Reducing Configurations to Monitor in a Software Product Line

Eric | July 26, 2010

Joint work with Chang Hwan Peter Kim, Don Batory, and Sarfraz Khurshid, to appear at RV 2010.

Abstract: A software product line is a family of programs where each program is defined by a unique combination of features. Product lines, like conventional programs, can be checked for safety properties through execution monitoring. However, because a product line induces a number of programs that is potentially exponential in the number of features, it would be very expensive to use existing monitoring techniques: one would have to apply those techniques to every single program. Doing so would also be wasteful because many programs can provably never violate the stated property. We introduce a monitoring technique dedicated to product lines that, given a safety property, statically determines the feature combinations that cannot possibly violate the property, thus reducing the number of programs to monitor. Experiments show that our technique is effective, particularly for safety properties that crosscut many optional features.

Download the paper here.

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Research
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Clara, Product Lines, Runtime verification

Tandem…

Eric | July 22, 2010

envelopeTandem is not just a bike with two seats, it also means “at last” in Latin. At last I received my Ph.D. Diploma today! After only eight months of waiting time –yeah! (clap) Guess in what language it was written? Click the photo…

I hope I will be able to translate it at some point. For US immigration officers this appears to be too hard of a job. :-)

Update: Here is the text and English translation. Thanks to Nicholas Greco!

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Misc, Research
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McGill